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Posted in response to Drilling small polished stones for stringing? from Tammis on November 21, 2010 at 09:54:46:

Re: Drilling small polished stones for stringing?

Tammis, As John mentioned, drill time is extremely important. Allow the debris to flush out with an up and down motion between drill times. This will also allow the drill bit to cool some. One thing I might add is that most Dremels start at 5000 rpm. Way to fast! Not sure what model you are using? Ideally you want a motor that starts at 0 rpm. Yours might be that type, not really sure. Does your model have a foot controller? I also have to agree with John in regards to buying the best bits you can afford. I personally like the triple riffle type. I can get quite a few stones drilled with that style. One last thing that I would like to mention here is always, always, always use a gfci protective device. For the money there is no better health insurance. Most electrocutions occur with the basic household outlet. That is a fact!!!!!

From Ward - November 22, 2010 at 10:51:54

Message: 69547



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