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Posted in response to Re: Re: Re: Re: Steve Duggan's photo from Steve Duggan on March 31, 2010 at 08:33:04:

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Steve Duggan's photo

Steve:
Lots of marine critters dig and live in burrows, eat their way through mud, or leave tracks or other impressions - these are generally lumped under trace fossils. A given type of critter will leave similar traces everywhere. Sometimes we find enough of the fossilized critter in association with it's traces to identify both the traces and the critter. Other trace fossils are common enough to get a name, but the critter remains unknown. If your specimen is indeed fossil feeding traces (note the IF), than quite likely there is fossil poop present. Silica has an affinity for decaying carbon compounds, maybe a pH thing, thus the abundance of selectively silicified fossils (and traces). Feeding traces/burrows are not especially rare or valuable, but are certainly interesting. Gotta love Geology!

From MikeR - April 01, 2010 at 08:43:27
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Message: 68925



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