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need some help

Greetings,

I recently came upon a curious looking mineral while hiking along a seldom used railroad track. Among the stone used along any major rail way, I seen a very shiny silver colored rock that seemed out of place. The best I can describe it, being a novice, is a light weight, brittle yet hard to break with a hammer, silver colored with smooth facets on the surface that have a mirror like shine to them. The rest of the surface is somewhat rough. They were few and far between, and usually appeared in small batches along the interior of the track. I suspect they feel off a train, as opposed to the common rocks that are used. A friend of mine took a sample, determined that it was indeed a metal, non-magnetic, and then attempted to melt it with his torch. He told me the ore became "white hot" before he noticed any movement that indicated it was in a molten state. Upon cooling, it said it had crystalized, and broke into "powder" when moved.
I found a Wikipedia entry for "chalcocite" and the pic used was a dead ringer for what I had found. Not thet I suspect it to be, just that it had a similar look. Does this ring any bells for you "more experienced" rock hounds? Any help would be more than appreciated.

To be a rock, and not to roll,
Mike

From Mike - November 08, 2007 at 13:55:33

Message: 65282

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