Archive Message Index Start New Topic Photo Gallery FAQ and Use Tips Bob's Rock Shop

Posted in response to Re: Rose Quartz from Rodney on July 27, 2005 at 13:01:18:

Re: Re: Rose Quartz

Massive rose, lavender and blue quartz form by exolution of fine fibers of several minerals, notably dumortierite and tourmaline (not rutile as is often quoted in textbooks) in the quartz cores of pegmatites. The cores that contain the colored types of quartz all form very deep (note the absense of open pockets in most of them) and are under many kilobars of pressure when they crystallize. This makes the quartz quite stressed. When they weather out, or are mined, the stress is released and the quartz splits along the crystallographic axes of the quartz (usually) forming columnar fragments of rose quartz, etc. Most masses will hold together during sawing, but cutting a sound stone is a different matter.

Henry Barwood

From Henry Barwood - July 27, 2005 at 19:08:43
Email: hbarwood[ ]intergate.com

Message: 38448

Archive Message Index Start New Topic Photo Gallery FAQ and Use Tips Bob's Rock Shop

Rough for Faceters    www.facetingrough.com    Check Our Specials!
Natural:   Amethyst   Ametrine   Bytownite   Chrome Diopside   Chrysoberyl   Citrine   Garnet   Petalite   Quartz   Sapphire   Spinel   Spodumene   Tanzanite   Topaz   Tourmaline   Zircon  
Synthetics:   Cubic Zirconia   Quartz   Laser Gem / Glass   Emerald   Red Beryl   Alexandrite   Spinel  

Bob Keller